Sunday, October 11, 2009

20th Century Barbershops ~ #11 In A Series



Both of these barbershop photographs were taken in 1942, and although both are in the United States, they were a world apart. The first was taken by Russell Lee at a Japanese-American internment camp, first thought to be in Oregon, but later determined to be the Tule Lake Relocation Center in Newell, California. It shows a group of eight girls posing in front of the camp's barber shop. Franklin Delano Roosevelt had American citizens of Japanese descent forcibly removed from their hometowns and detained in interment camps for the duration of World War II.

The picture below was taken the same year by Louise Rosskam, and shows a quiet street in downtown Washington, D.C., with a row of stores that includes a barbershop. Both pictures were taken for the Farm Services Administration, as part of their ongoing project documenting life in the United States.

6 comments:

steven said...

hello golden west, the first picture is intriguing to me as just last week my class and i were learning about the relocation of japanese canadians. the kids were really surprised and mystified. they were equally surprised when they found out that there had been a prisoner of war camp not thirty miles from their classroom!! have a lovely day out there!! steven

Anil P said...

Such a different era, literally and figuratively!

The second picture is evocative not so much for the absence of people but for the golden hue of a seemingly quiet stret.

The Farm Services Administration that you speak of, do they continue to document life in the United States now?

High Desert Diva said...

All these photos you've been posting have brilliant color. Is it original, or have they been digitally enhanced?

Rachel Fenton said...

Thank you for stopping by my blog. I am really enjoying trawling through the photographs/info on yours.
You don't happen to know what stone the New York savings bank is built from, do you?

Delwyn said...

Hi GW

the Japanese Internment camps were a strange part of history. In New Zealand where I grew up they interned a few German residents...it must have been a long war for these people...


Happy days

Tracy said...

It is sad to think of these people in a camp for months and months on end... Amazing how these ladies are smiling. LOVE the second photo--that colors and light are so lovely! Happy Day, Golden West ((HUGS))